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The first autologous human red blood cells from stem cells

This breakthrough could enable transfused people to become their own donors, enough to solve the problems of blood supply and reduce the risk of infection during transfusions
This breakthrough could enable transfused people to become their own donors, enough to solve the problems of blood supply and reduce the risk of infection during transfusions
 

The special journal Blood of the American Association of Hematology published on Thursday, the results of a team of French researchers that could revolutionize the field of blood transfusions. Researchers at the Joint Research Unit Inserm-UPMC and the AP-HP are indeed able to perform the first autologous human red blood cells from stem cells.

Ultimately, this breakthrough could enable transfused people to become their own donors, enough to solve the problems of blood supply and reduce the risk of infection during transfusions.

After conducting tests on mice, the team led by Luc Douay led his experience on a volunteer donor. The researchers then injected into the patient's body red blood cells grown (RCMP) from his own stem cells. They then observed their survival in the bloodstream. With 94% to 100% survival rate after five days, then 41 to 63% after 26 days, "the life and survival of cultured cells are similar to those of classic red blood cells", note Inserm in a statement. "This supports their validity as a possible source of transfusion," concluded the Institute.

To complete the experience, the team of Prof. Douay produced in the laboratory billion RcMP from human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), the cells that produce all types of blood cells. They also made use of growth factors that help regulate the proliferation and maturation of these cells.

The road to blood autotransfusion is open, but it has yet to benefit from progress, particularly in regard to large-scale production of HSC, so that future transfusions are no longer dependent on generous donors who often are in short supply .

 
 
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