Friday 26th August, 2016   |   Welcome, guest. Please, login or register  
Wednesday August 25, 09:24

More strokes in winter?

Decrease in temperature by one degree would cause a 2% increase the risk of myocardial infarction. Img: medical-look.com
Decrease in temperature by one degree would cause a 2% increase the risk of myocardial infarction. Img: medical-look.com
 

A study published in the British Medical Journal reveals that a decrease in temperature by one degree would cause a 2% increase the risk of myocardial infarction within 28 days after the fall of the temperature.

The researchers studied 84,010 cases for myocardial infarction between January 2003 and December 2006 in England and Wales. They managed to establish that the reduction of temperature is strongly associated with an increased risk of heart attack, especially during the first fifteen days following the drop in temperature.

The study also reports that people aged 75-84 years are particularly vulnerable to cold, as well as patients with coronary heart disease.

"The risk of myocardial infarction among those most at risk could be reduced through intervention programs and measures put in place when the forecasts point to a drop in temperature," said authors of the study.

 
 
Rate:
 
 

Recommended articles:

 

The alcohol would help reduce cardiac risk in men

The alcohol would help reduce cardiac risk in men
Regular consumption of alcohol would reduce by about one third the risk of CHD (myocardial infarction, angina pectoris) in men, according to a Spanish study.
 

A Test To Rule Out Patients At Risk Of Heart Attack?

Chest pain does not necessarily mean a heart attack. A blood test would show it in the future a little better results, according to a study.
Chest pain does not necessarily mean a heart attack. A blood test would show it in the future a little better results, according to a study.
 

Heart attacks: Women die often than men

Women had twice as much risk of dying from a heart attack than men who had a heart attack
Significantly more women die than men due to cardiovascular disease because they rarely receive examinations and treatment applied routinely to men, according to a study by French researchers presented Tuesday the United States.
 

Most recent in the category Social Health:

 
 
 

Last comments

 

No comments. Be the first to comment the article!

 
Please, login or post your comment anonymously.

Your comment:

 
 
 
 
 

Home | Social Health | AIDS | Cancer | Diseases | Diet | Human body | Most read | Top rated

RSS | Feedback | Headlines for your website | Terms of Service/Privacy policy

Copyright © 2016 Heal-all.org. All rights reserved.